TIME magazine has published the inaugural Time 100 Next list of rising stars
Bobi Wine.

Here are seven influential Africans that made the list.

Bobi Wine

 influential young Africans
Robert Kyagulanyi, popularly known as Bobi Wine

Robert Kyagulanyi, popularly known as Bobi Wine is a Ugandan popstar turned politician.

The 37 year-old musician, has sung songs that are highly critical of the Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni, who has ruled Uganda for the past 33 years.

In 2017, Bobi joined politics and won a parliamentary seat as an independent in the same year. Wine calls himself the ‘Ghetto President’ and has led opposition lawmakers and activists to condemn government policies in his country.

He gained global prominence in 2018 following his arrest alongside several opposition politicians accused of stoning the president’s convoy.

He was charged with treason, and his military detention sparked protests from Ugandans and rights activists abroad until his release.

In his interview with TIME, he said, “Eighty percent of our population is under the age of 35. They deserve a leader who works for the future of Uganda, not for himself.”

Oluwaseun Ayodeji Osowobi

 influential young Africans
Oluwaseun Ayodeji Osowobi

Osowobi is a Nigerian born women’s rights activist.

Drawing from her personal experience, Osowobi, 29, started an organization dedicated to advocating against sexual violence by providing psychosocial services to survivors of sexual violence.

Her organization, Stand To End Rape (STER) Initiative, has reached around 200,000 people in Nigeria through its services, such as training for health workers and providing legal services for survivors.

She was honored as the 2019 Commonwealth young person of the year, and is one of Nigeria’s vocal voices in the country’s #metoo movement.

Njideka Akunyili Crosby

 influential young Africans
Njideka Akunyili Crosby

Crosby is a Nigerian born visual artist working in the US.

She is the daughter of the late Prof. Mrs. Dora Akunyili.

Many of her art have been auctioned for millions and often feature images of family and friends in every day domestic settings.

Crosby, 36, created a mural on the walls of the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art in 2018.

It featured scenes of domestic life: in one part, a woman rests her elbow on a table, deep in thought.

Wanuri Kahiu

 influential young Africans
Wanuri Kahiu

Kahiu is an award-winning Kenyan filmmaker.

In 2010, she created Kenya’s first sci-fi movie, ‘Pumzi, which won the best short film at the Cannes Independent Film Festival.

A lot of Kahiu’s work deals with themes that are often considered controversial in Kenya, including feminism and LGBTQ rights.

In 2018, her movie, ‘Rafiki’, a hopeful story of two women in love was banned by Kenya’s Film and Classifications Board (KFCB) for its intent to “promote lesbianism.”

Last year, Kahiu, 39, sued the KFCB for violating her right to free speech, and remains a firm advocate for LGBTQ rights in the country.

Adut Akech

 influential young Africans
Adut Akech

Akech is a South Sudanese-Australian model.

She was a former child refugee who spent the first eight years of her life in Kenya’s Kakuma refugee camp before migrating to Australia.

Akech, 19, made her fashion week runway debut for Yves Saint Laurent in 2016, and has walked for many brands including Chanel, Valentino, and Givenchy.

Akech has served as a guest editor for CNN style, and is today one of the most in-demand models regularly working in fashion.

Kwame Onwuachi

 influential young Africans
Kwame Onwuachi

Onwuachi is a Nigerian-American chef based in the US.

In 2012, he enrolled at the Culinary Institute of America in New York and eventually worked as a cook at Eleven Madison Park.

Onwuachi, 30, was a contestant on season 13 of Top Chef, and in 2019, he was named by the Food & Wine magazine as one its Best New Chefs.

Joy Buolamwini

 influential young Africans
Joy Buolamwini

She is a Ghanaian-American computer scientist and activist based at the MIT Media Lab.

Buolamwini, 30, founded the Algorithmic Justice League, an organization that highlights the social implications of Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Buolamini’s MIT thesis methodology researched large racial and gender bias in Al services major technology companies. Her research has been covered in 40 countries.

She currently works with government executives in Europe on ways to reduce the harm of AI. “The more I engage with companies and policymakers, the more I am convinced responsible innovation cannot happen if we leave companies to sort themselves out. The age of ‘just trust us’ is over,” she told TIME.

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